Gender is Not Sex

g≠s

374,878 notes

steambot-timelord:

ashkenazi-autie:

eileenthequeen:

eileenthequeen:

So apparently in my sister’s class, there was a trans girl that had been on the cheerleading squad for a while. When she came out, the other girls on the squad made the agreement that whatever boy made fun of her would never get a date. And if you think that’s not the most metal girl alliance ever, you can sit down.

Wow, 500 notes

Girls protecting girls.

GIRLS PROTECTING GIRLS

(Source: passive-aggressiveprincess, via ssohshit)

Filed under i love this post girls protecting girls transkids trans girls

3,953 notes

myfurby:

The first thing they do at my university orientation is talk about preferred pronouns and why pronouns matter. Then they went around to EVERYONE and asked them which pronouns they wanted to be referred to as.This is the beginning of a revolution. I hope all schools do this in the future!

myfurby:

The first thing they do at my university orientation is talk about preferred pronouns and why pronouns matter. Then they went around to EVERYONE and asked them which pronouns they wanted to be referred to as.This is the beginning of a revolution. I hope all schools do this in the future!

(via remyrawr)

Filed under pronouns

35,665 notes

sugaryumyum:

Argentina: doing it right. After passing a groundbreaking gender identity law on Wednesday, Argentina, which became the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, now leads the entire world when it comes to trans rights.
The new law, which was passed by 55-0 and is expected to be signed by president Cristina Fernandez, grants trans people the right to legally change their gender identity without having to get approval from doctors or judges–and, importantly, without having to change their bodies at all first. Not having a valid ID that matches your gender identity is a huge barrier to access to education, employment, health care, you name it. As Kalym Sori, an Argentinian trans man said, “This is why the law of identity is so important. It opens the door to the rest of our rights.”

sugaryumyum:

Argentina: doing it right. After passing a groundbreaking gender identity law on Wednesday, Argentina, which became the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage, now leads the entire world when it comes to trans rights.

The new law, which was passed by 55-0 and is expected to be signed by president Cristina Fernandez, grants trans people the right to legally change their gender identity without having to get approval from doctors or judges–and, importantly, without having to change their bodies at all first. Not having a valid ID that matches your gender identity is a huge barrier to access to education, employment, health care, you name it. As Kalym Sori, an Argentinian trans man said, “This is why the law of identity is so important. It opens the door to the rest of our rights.”

(via raethequeenofchaos)

64,899 notes

shipyaoilikefedx:

anarchoprincess:

j0ye:

I took this picture of Oli and myself today at the pool. After we got done swimming, we were walking home and had to pass by a group of cheerleaders that were practicing on my uni’s campus. One of the cheerleaders looked at Oliver and said, “She’s so cute!” With a smile on my face, I ruffled Oli’s hair and said, “HE.” as we continued walking past her. Immediately the girl winced, turned to her friend, and said, “Oh my god, she’s turning him gay..”
I am not turning my son gay by allowing him to express himself by wearing a floral dress. I’m so sick of people making comments that I’m altering my son’s sexual orientation or his gender identity because he’s wearing a dress. IT’S A DRESS. IT IS LITERALLY CLOTHING. If he is gay, that’s cool, I’ll accept him no matter what, and if he decides at any point he’s anything but a boy, I’ll still accept him (er, them/her). But allowing him to pick out his own clothes and taking him clothes shopping with me so he can pick out what he likes is not going to have ANY affect on his orientation/identity. The only concern I have about him wearing a dress is when he pulls it up to show me how big his tummy is in public, because I don’t want him showing a bunch of strangers his underwear.
If he was a little girl wearing a pair of shorts or a t-shirt with a dump truck on it, no one would say anything, because dressing as a boy is different. People see wearing a dress as a negative thing when you’re a boy, they say he’ll turn gay and that I’m a bad mom and I’m trying to turn him into a girl. But the bottom line is that him wearing a dress has nothing to do with being a boy or his orientation. If he’s gay, he’s gay. He’s too young to slap a sexuality on him at 3 and a half, and that’s not something I’m particularly worried about, because at this age he treats everybody the same and doesn’t have comprehension of what sexual/romantic attraction is. Wearing a dress has nothing to do with that.
He is a boy. He plays with dump trucks, rolls around in dirt, growls at everyone, and pretends to fart for fun. He also paints his nails, is obsessed with Sailor Moon, refers to himself as Princess Oliver, and yes, wears dresses. He is a boy.

best thing ever omg I’m crying you’re the perfect mother 

If  I ever become a mother, I want to be like you.

shipyaoilikefedx:

anarchoprincess:

j0ye:

I took this picture of Oli and myself today at the pool. After we got done swimming, we were walking home and had to pass by a group of cheerleaders that were practicing on my uni’s campus. One of the cheerleaders looked at Oliver and said, “She’s so cute!” With a smile on my face, I ruffled Oli’s hair and said, “HE.” as we continued walking past her. Immediately the girl winced, turned to her friend, and said, “Oh my god, she’s turning him gay..”

I am not turning my son gay by allowing him to express himself by wearing a floral dress. I’m so sick of people making comments that I’m altering my son’s sexual orientation or his gender identity because he’s wearing a dress. IT’S A DRESS. IT IS LITERALLY CLOTHING. If he is gay, that’s cool, I’ll accept him no matter what, and if he decides at any point he’s anything but a boy, I’ll still accept him (er, them/her). But allowing him to pick out his own clothes and taking him clothes shopping with me so he can pick out what he likes is not going to have ANY affect on his orientation/identity. The only concern I have about him wearing a dress is when he pulls it up to show me how big his tummy is in public, because I don’t want him showing a bunch of strangers his underwear.

If he was a little girl wearing a pair of shorts or a t-shirt with a dump truck on it, no one would say anything, because dressing as a boy is different. People see wearing a dress as a negative thing when you’re a boy, they say he’ll turn gay and that I’m a bad mom and I’m trying to turn him into a girl. But the bottom line is that him wearing a dress has nothing to do with being a boy or his orientation. If he’s gay, he’s gay. He’s too young to slap a sexuality on him at 3 and a half, and that’s not something I’m particularly worried about, because at this age he treats everybody the same and doesn’t have comprehension of what sexual/romantic attraction is. Wearing a dress has nothing to do with that.

He is a boy. He plays with dump trucks, rolls around in dirt, growls at everyone, and pretends to fart for fun. He also paints his nails, is obsessed with Sailor Moon, refers to himself as Princess Oliver, and yes, wears dresses. He is a boy.

best thing ever omg I’m crying you’re the perfect mother 

If  I ever become a mother, I want to be like you.

(via alexisremarke)

Filed under parenting done right